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Tata Steel 2013 Round 4 - A Superb Win By Vishy Anand!

  • SonofPearl
  • on 15.01.13 12:23.

tata_logo blue.jpgThe 2013 Tata Steel Chess is taking place from 12-27 January in Wijk Aan Zee in the Netherlands.

This famous annual tournament has three separate single round-robin competitions, the A, B, and C Groups, each featuring 14 players.

The strongest tournament is the A Group and this year features 6 out of the top 10 ranked players; world champion Vishy Anand, world #1 Magnus Carlsen, defending champion Lev Aronian, rising star Fabiano Caruana, world #6 Sergey Karjakin, and US champion Hikaru Nakamura.

Chess.com has live coverage and commentary of a selection of rounds.  See here for the latest details (scroll down the page). Wednesday is a rest day.

Chess.com coverage starts at 05:30 Pacific, 08:30 Eastern in the US (13:30 UTC).


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Round 4 - Official website report

It was a day full of wins and losses, twists and turns, but still one game stood out head and shoulders above the rest. World Champion Viswanathan Anand used the black pieces versus 2nd seed Levon Aronian to create an evergreen that left all present in awe, not in the least Magnus Carlsen who called it “mind blowing”.

As the Indian Grandmaster explained afterwards, he used the preparation for his World Championship's match against Boris Gelfand from last year. A novelty on move 12 was the prelude to a series of sacrifices starting with 15...Bc5! Aronian plunged into deep thought, but was unable to solve his problems and after 16.Be2 Nde5! 17.Bxg4 Bxd4 18.Kh1 Bxg4 19.Nxf8 Anand crowned his attack with the beautiful 19...f5! and White was unable to stop the black queen from joining the attack.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Vishy Anand.jpg

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Joining Anand at 3 out of 4 is the world's highest rated player ever, Magnus Carlsen, who slowly but surely increased the pressure on Pentala Harikrishna's position until it finally gave away. Harikrishna resigned before Carlsen could deliver the knock-out with 50.Nxf6!.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Magnus Carlsen.jpg

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Also at three points is Sergey Karjakin who was lucky to escape after misplaying the opening against Hikaru Nakamura. The American Grandmaster was carefully nurturing his extra pawn into a winning queen endgame, until one slip let the Russian off the hook.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Hikaru Nakamura.jpg

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The best Dutchman after 4 rounds is Loek van Wely who moved back to 50% at the expense of his countryman Erwin l'Ami. The latter sacrificed an exchange on the black side of a Trompovsky, but never got anything to show for it.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Erwin Lami.jpg

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Also back on an even score is Wang Hao of China who used the advantage of a strong bishop over a stray knight to take down his fellow student at Beijing University, Hou Yifan.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Hou Yifan.jpg
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Italy's Fabiano Caruana bounced back from yesterday's loss at the hands of Anand by utilizing a 4-to-2 (!) central pawn majority to down Ivan Sokolov.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Ivan Sokolov.jpg

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The most balanced game of the day was the draw between Anish Giri and Peter Leko. The latter equalized easily in an endgame that arose after only a handful of moves.

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Tata 2013 Round 4 Peter Leko.jpg

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Group A Standings After 4 Rounds

1 Carlsen, Magnus  NOR  2861 3
2 Anand, Viswanathan  IND  2772 3
3 Karjakin, Sergey  RUS  2780 3
4 Nakamura, Hikaru  USA  2769 2
5 Caruana, Fabiano  ITA  2781 2
6 Leko, Peter  HUN  2735 2
7 Harikrishna, Pentala  IND  2698 2
8 Van Wely, Loek  NED  2679 2
9 Wang, Hao  CHN  2752 2
10 Aronian, Levon  ARM  2802
11 Giri, Anish  NED  2720
12 L'Ami, Erwin  NED  2627
13 Sokolov, Ivan  NED  2663
14 Hou, Yifan  CHN  2603 1

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In Group B leaders Sergey Tiviakov and Richard Rapport opened a gap after winning once more. Tiviakov used his superior pieces to outplay Predrag Nikolic), while Rapport used a nice tactical motive to create havoc in Sergey Movsesian's position. After 18.Ne4 Nc6 19.Bg5 Qd8 Black missed the cunning 20.Bg4! and White won easily.

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Group B Round 4 Results

Van Kampen, Robin  0-1  Grandelius, Nils 
Ipatov, Alexander  ½-½  Smeets, Jan
Naiditsch, Arkadij  ½-½  Dubov, Daniil
Timman, Jan H  ½-½  Turov, Maxim
Nikolic, Predrag  0-1  Tiviakov, Sergei
Rapport, Richard  1-0  Movsesian, Sergei
Edouard, Romain 0-1  Ernst, Sipke

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Group B Standings After Round 4

1 Tiviakov, Sergei  NED  2655
2 Rapport, Richard  HUN  2621
3 Timman, Jan H  NED  2566
4 Smeets, Jan  NED  2615
5 Dubov, Daniil  RUS  2600 2
6 Movsesian, Sergei  ARM  2688 2
7 Naiditsch, Arkadij  GER  2708 2
8 Grandelius, Nils  SWE  2572 2
9 Ipatov, Alexander  TUR  2587
10 Turov, Maxim  RUS  2630
11 Nikolic, Predrag  BIH  2619
12 Edouard, Romain  FRA  2686
13 Van Kampen, Robin  NED  2581 1
14 Ernst, Sipke  NED  2556 1

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In Group C Argentina's Fernanda Peralta moved into clear first with 3½ out of 4 after beating Holland's Lisa Schut, runner-up at the World Youth Girls Under 18 Championship (behind Russia's Aleksandra Goryachkina, also playing in this group).

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Group C Round 4 Results

Goryachkina, Aleksandra  ½-½  Burg, Twan 
Romanishin, Oleg M  1-0  Van Der Werf, Mark
Admiraal, Miguoel  ½-½  Gretarsson, Hjorvar Steinn
Klein, David  1-0  Mekhitarian, Krikor Sevag
Kovchan, Alexander  1-0  Bitensky, Igor
Peralta, Fernando  1-0  Schut, Lisa
Swinkels, Robin ½-½  Brunello, Sabino

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Group C Standings After Round 4

1 Peralta, Fernando  ARG  2617
2 Brunello, Sabino  ITA  2572 3
3 Gretarsson, Hjorvar Steinn  ISL  2516 3
4 Mekhitarian, Krikor Sevag  BRA  2543
5 Kovchan, Alexander  UKR  2579
6 Bitensky, Igor  ISR  2400 2
7 Swinkels, Robin  NED  2508 2
8 Romanishin, Oleg M  UKR  2521 2
9 Klein, David  NED  2445 2
10 Admiraal, Miguoel  NED  2321
11 Burg, Twan  NED  2492
12 Van Der Werf, Mark  NED  2450 1
13 Goryachkina, Aleksandra  RUS  2402 1
14 Schut, Lisa  NED  2295 ½ 

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Photos from the official website. Videos by Freshmen media. Games via TWIC.

16534 Aufrufe 47 Kommentare
5 Stimmen

Kommentare


  • vor 22 Monate

    trakoz

    Vishy's game is born of so much experience playing World Chess Championship for several years.

    In the game with Magnus Carlsen, it's worth mentioning...

    "Harikrishna resigned before Carlsen could deliver the knock-out with 50.Nxf6!."

    Thank you for the nice news page. Enjoyed it.

  • vor 23 Monate

    BodySlam

    Congratulations Vishy! Yet another masterpiece. This game against Aronian should go down as game of the...

  • vor 23 Monate

    cimzowitsch

    Surprised

  • vor 23 Monate

    imaginechess

    This was kind of logical ....as the knight was most active piece of aronian,anand decides to exchange a his rook with  knight.... the rest pieces of aronian were just inactive including his queen..anand bishops,knights were just pointing towards king of aronian..thus anand utilizing his material efficiently...truly this was "anands immortal"game.. 

  • vor 23 Monate

    rp_lazarte

    MABUHAY ANAND, YOU ARE TRULY THE WORLD CHAMPION, SIMPLY AMAZING!!

  • vor 23 Monate

    shahrokh1975

    wonderful games!

  • vor 23 Monate

    stupid_chess

    magnus-anand. draw game

  • vor 23 Monate

    amrita1

           Congratulations Vishy !!!

  • vor 23 Monate

    maturner

    Yeah the Anand-Aronian game was quite something. I don't think a 2800 player has ever suffered a defeat like that one before. I think chess fans can stop worrying about whether Vishy still has it or not.

  • vor 23 Monate

    Chess_Lover11

    Take that Anand haters!

  • vor 23 Monate

    GMRufus

    game of the year so far by anand

  • vor 23 Monate

    _valentin_

    In the Carlsen-Harikrishna game there was an excellent proposed sacrifice 41.Qf2! by Carlsen, which took me some minutes of thought to decipher, as some of the variations are 10 moves long.  
    Here is what I see, for the benefit of those of you who may ask why it is okay for white to leave the knight on b4 unprotected by 41.Qf2.

    41.Qf2! Qxb4 (if black takes, then a forced win by white follows...) 42.Qg3 (threatening checkmate) Qf8 (not 42...Rg8? 43.Qg6+ Kh8 44.Qxh5x) 43.Rf7 Qg8 (if 43...Qh8 44.Qg6+ Kg8 45.Ra7 -- opening the f7-square for the queen with tempo -- 45...Bc6 46.Qf7+ Kh7 47.Qxh5+ Kg8 48.Qf7+ Kh7 49.Qxf6, and white completely exposes the black king by removing all pawns, without slowing down their attack; next is the g7-pawn after f5-f6 meets it pinned against the king, and white wins) 44.Qf3 (threatening checkmate) Kh8 (if 44...Kh6 45.Qf4+ Kh7 46.Qxa4, and white has regained the sacrificed material with an ongoing strong attack) 45.Ra7 (attempting to displace the bishop, which is the defender of the rook on e8, after a prepared queen check on h5) Bb5 46.Rb7 Ba4 47.Rb4 Ra8 (since the bishop has no squares to escape along the a4-e8 diagonal from where to continue to protect the rook on e8) 48.Qxh5+ (now all is ready for this final motif) Qh7 49.Qf3 (forcing the rook to either abandon the bishop on a4, or abandon the back-rank, since 49...Qh8 50.Rh4+ wins black's queen as in the mainline) Ra7 50.Rb8+, and white wins easily.

    Hope you enjoyed this, just as much as the Vishy Anand chef d'oeuvre!

  • vor 23 Monate

    harshspm21

    what a game vishy!!!!!!!!! surely back to winning ways with a bang!!!!!!!

  • vor 23 Monate

    drumdaddy

    I'll always remember where I was during the Anand Evergreen - joining Danny Rensch and Ben Finegold  and a mob of players in group mental concussion. Jaws were dropping, teeth spilling, babbling ensued. Vishy, you blew our minds!

  • vor 23 Monate

    Dnyan-TheWarrior

    This world is so double standard!

    Anand-Aronian was one of the best game ever as told by many GMs & Carlson. Anand just confessed that it was home preparation (Only 12..c5) with such honesty rather than showing to the world as if he is God with such Brilliance.

    We should appreciate that he remember somewhat from lakhs of lines which he prepared 1 year back. Hats of to such gentle & honest human being!

    (Only 12...C5 was home prep. where white generally responds with B*h7. 15...Bc5, 16...Ne5, 19...f5 were found on Board)

  • vor 23 Monate

    Lawdoginator

    Wow! 

  • vor 23 Monate

    duniel

    According to what Anand said, Ne5 and f5 was found OTB, no reason not to believe him.

  • vor 23 Monate

    Pavrey

    Anand's game would have made Capa proud

  • vor 23 Monate

    forrie

    i was watching the carlsen game live. Carlsens opening choices are interesting. After move 3 he allowed black to equalise. I dont know why he allows that? Maybe to prevent that his opponents are prepared. He likes to play outside the book.

  • vor 23 Monate

    ChocolateTeapot

    The Anand bashers are showing remarkable double standards here. Levon is probably the best prepared player in the world, with a whole army of GM helpers. When he wins a game because of this, no one says word. Anand has much more modest resources, and he freely admitted the role that preparation had played.

    The fact is that preparation is an essential part of chess, and one of the factors that distinguishes players at the very top. As amateurs we might not like it, but there is nothing we can do about it. It is the reason I gave up competitive chess 40 years ago.

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