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Candidates Tournament Round 4

  • SonofPearl
  • on 19.03.13 13:51.

Annotations by GM Sam Shankland
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Magnus Carlsen beat Alexander Grischuk in round four of the 2013 Candidates Tournament to move into a share of the lead with Lev Aronian on 3/4 points.

With 4.d3 Carlsen declined to enter the mainline Berlin and an imbalanced position developed. Attacks on opposite wings guaranteed excitement as the players raced to break through first.

It was Carlsen who gained the upper hand, and although Grischuk seemed to have chances on the kingside, his habitual time trouble combined with Carlsen's accurate defence left him lost before the first time control.  In the post-match press conference Carlsen said "I wasn't overly happy with the first two games, but now I've got two wins I'm right where I need to be."

Magnus Carlsen won his second game in a row

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Today's victim was Alexander Grischuk

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1.e4. Still best by test?

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First to finish was the game between Lev Aronian and Peter Svidler. It was excellent home preparation from Svidler once again, this time achieving a comfortable draw by catching Aronian by surprise with the Queen's Gambit Accepted.

Peter Svidler showed more great home preparation

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Accepted? Aronian was taken by surprise in the opening.

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The bottom of the table encounter between Boris Gelfand and Vassily Ivanchuk provided unexpected fireworks as Ivanchuk once again chose an offbeat opening line: the Chigorin Defence to the Queen's Gambit.  A ferocious struggle ended in a draw by perpetual check, but it was hugely entertaining while it lasted! 

Bloodied, but unbowed. Gelfand and Ivanchuk fought each other like wounded tigers.

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Last to finish was the game between Teimour Radjabov and Vladimir Kramnik.  It was an evenly matched encounter arising out of a Nimzo-Indian which ended in a draw after 50 moves.


A draw for Radjabov and Kramnik

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The view of the playing area from the audience.

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Magnus Carlsen and the head of organisers AGON, Andrew Paulson, were interviewed by the BBC:

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The standings after four rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872 3
Levon Aronian ARM 2809 3
Peter Svidler RUS 2747
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793 2
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 2
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740 1
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 1

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Anastasiya Karlovich at the official website, and Ray Morris-Hill (where indicated).

13780 Aufrufe 72 Kommentare
6 Stimmen

Kommentare


  • vor 17 Monate

    diogens

    chessdoggblack  No, Carlsen has seen that in the two last years and declared so. His style is likely Capablanca and he can outplay anybody except Aronian, when the latter is in good form.

    I see this statement as one of a very mature guy (unlikely 22) and of a very deep understanding of the game

  • vor 17 Monate

    chessdoggblack

    Did anyone notice how Carlsen reacted in the press conference after the draw that "Ivan the terrible" put on him: very disgusted, unrefined and ungentleman like. It's the first time I think that I have seen him become unglued. He like Gelfand thought it would be just another walk in the park...not so. Tell tale sign: Carlsen thinks he can just beat anyone before him every time...not so. This is chess and he is playing against another mind that thinks just like him...deep. Another sign of notice...Carlsen appears to have a touch of brattiness. To cover for this blemish, he admitted to the chess world in round 5 that he underestimated  Ivanchuk; this is to state that he disrespected the man and his chess skills. So here we see if we look closely, someone that plays well but can become out of control. Now Anand knows this and will take advantage of this attitude: "I don't care 2 cents about any of you chess players, because I am a chess God." I sincerely believe that Anand will be prepared to destroy this myth.

  • vor 17 Monate

    mvtjc

    @SonofPearl thanks!

  • vor 17 Monate

    diogens

    titust   simply because it was not forseen as accepted and then he could draw an unexpected line    

  • vor 17 Monate

    titust

    I wonder why Peter Svidler played the Queens Gamit Accepted.

  • vor 17 Monate

    PhilipN

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for the annotations!  Most sites don't do annotations quite like this--even the ones with live commentary don't have such enlightening commentary for us amateurs, and frequently spit out lines of analysis without real explanations about the more basic points of the position (I'd wondered why Grischuk didn't recapture with the pawn until your annotation pointed out that it just loses a pawn), and without giving us the chance to click through the moves of a variation rather than making us try to visualize it all.

  • vor 17 Monate

    SonofPearl

    @ mvtjc Yes, this tournament counts for ratings.

  • vor 17 Monate

    mvtjc

    Just want to know, do their rating change or affected by the game results in this tournament?

  • vor 17 Monate

    Marcokim

    To those suggesting Bg5 attacking Queen... that loses quickly to

    24. Bg5...e3, 25. Bxf6...exd2, attacking both rook and bishop...

    Carlsen had bigger strategic goals than a cheapo tactical greed at this point. He needed to consolidate his L-barrier and then march his a-file pawn to Queen. Thats the basic strategy, anything else won't beat a 2700+ GM.

    Marco et Shiko

  • vor 17 Monate

    diogens

     Zinsch

    Yes, I remember that Leko game where Carlsen moved just his king on the 7th/8 rank, and Leko trying to find a hole for 20 moves when there wasn't any.

    I think his opps are completely intimidated (except Aronian). When such a solid player as Grischuk goes for a very dubious attacking line...Undecided

  • vor 17 Monate

    Marcokim

    Carlsen 2850+ !!! I witnessed first hand (Wei Yi) a 14yr old chinese GM demolish our top players in a 4board simul (our top guys are between 1800 and 2100) and the kid is "only" 2550 or so, imagine playing Carlsen??? Thats insane.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Marcokim

    ok thanks @Roblinde, I guess I don't have to ask why:)

  • vor 17 Monate

    ildolphino

    Grischuk explained in the press conference that he overestimated his position before playing ...f5. He further said that he missed a lot of resources for white in the possible lines after f5 (which he probably saw a few moves later).

  • vor 17 Monate

    Ecurbetneilav628

    I wish Levon Aronian to win the match and challenge Anand for the championship!!!!!

  • vor 17 Monate

    cimzowitsch

     We have a few more rounds Chucky...Yell,,,get em,,

  • vor 17 Monate

    Adrian_Kinnersley

    I like the annotation on the games here. It's nice to have that; thank you.

  • vor 17 Monate

    _valentin_

    Grischuk made uncharacteristic mistakes for someone of his strength: having a lost position by move 20 in a line that he has obviously prepared (at least until move 10) was a big gift to Carlsen.

    Ivanchuk once again played very entertaining chess, at risk to his results -- but this time there was enough initiative for him to at least reach a draw (after Gelfand's correct defense).

  • vor 17 Monate

    Zinsch

    @diogens: At Tata Steel in January, Carlsen had quite a few endings, when he was playing black, where it was the opponent, who had practical chances of winning, but Carlsen drew 'em all.

  • vor 17 Monate

    chessrook1234

    Chucky! Good Luck in game 5!! White against Carlsen!! We need another createive opening ;-((

    Beat Carlsen in an End Game and end the Myth ;-))

  • vor 17 Monate

    diogens

    I find amusing Carlsens recurrent sentence:

    " I think the endgame was drawn but I saw some practical chances..."

    The funny thing is that the practical chances of winning seem always to be on his side. His partners are only left with practical chances of losing "drawn endings"  Undecided

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