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Candidates Tournament Round 13

  • SonofPearl
  • on 31.03.13 13:09.

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There was a very tense atmosphere in round 13 of the London Candidates Tournament - the penultimate day of the competition.  Both Vladimir Kramnik and Magnus Carlsen were absolutely determined to win their games against Boris Gelfand and Teimour Radjabov respectively. 
Vladimir Kramnik had the advantage of the white pieces and played the novel idea 5.e3 in a fianchetto Gruenfeld sideline, putting Gelfand under great pressure and eventually winning a pawn.  But Gelfand was tenacious in defence, finding the crucial move 38...Rd8 as the time control approached to save the game.
A relaxed Boris Gelfand before the game
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Kramnik pressed hard, but Gelfand was equal to the task
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Magnus Carlsen had the black pieces against Teimour Radjabov, and opted for the Nimzo-Indian after Radjabov played 1.d4.  Radjabov slowly drifted into a slightly worse endgame, and Carlsen kept trying everything he could to keep the game alive and induce a mistake from his opponent.  Deep into the 6th hour of the game Radjabov was surviving almost solely on the 30 second time increment and Carlsen picked up a vital pawn.  Finally, incredibly, after nearly 7 hours of play Carlsen won the game!
Magnus Carlsen won an amazingly tense game
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Teimour Radjabov finally succumbed to Magnus Carlsen after nearly 7 hours
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The first game to finish today was the encounter between Peter Svidler and Vassily Ivanchuk. The spinning roulette wheel that seems to determine Chucky's choice of opening in this tournament stopped today at the French Defence. Svidler obtained a pleasant game with the advance variation and as Ivanchuk struggled to cope with his inferior position he lost on time for the fifth time in the tournament.
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Peter Svidler did what Magnus Carlsen couldn't - beating Vassily Ivanchuk
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Despite his loss to Vladimir Kramnik yesterday, Lev Aronian still had a mathematical chance of winning the tournament, but even that minuscule possibility vanished when he only drew with Alexander Grischuk, in the second game to finish today. 

Alexander Grischuk and Lev Aronian drew their game

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So Magnus Carlsen and Vladimir Kramnik both have a score of 8½/13 going into the final round tomorrow.  But Carlsen has the superior tie-break score, so as long as he achieves at least the same result as Kramnik he will win the tournament.  Carlsen has white against Svidler, and Kramnik has black against Ivanchuk.

The standings after 13 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810
Peter Svidler RUS 2747 7
Levon Aronian ARM 2809 7
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740 6
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764 6
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 5
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793 4

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand 1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 0 - 1 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian 0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

21627 Aufrufe 153 Kommentare
16 Stimmen

Kommentare


  • vor 17 Monate

    EternalChess

    Chessrook1234, you are an idiot.

  • vor 17 Monate

    EternalChess

    Thank you for being honest Gelfand and trying your best. You have gained my respect this tournament.

    Ivanchuk, I hope you try your best, I will still respect you if you lose but try your hardest (aka not lose on time). You lost a bit respect from many people due to flagging all the time then trying vs Carlsen (you clearly hate him). All I am asking if to do your best!

    Good luck to Svidler and I hope he plays fair too.

    Good luck to Carlsen and Kramnik, these 2 both deserve to face Anand and congrats to making it this far!

    And to Vodkarov.. you mad bro?

  • vor 17 Monate

    chessdoggblack

    Very terrible for me in my view of Carlsen not winning this tournament. Ivanchuk did well to upset the apple cart by beating Carlsen. That win turned the tide for everyone, and have Carlsen to lose it outright with the pressure on him and Kramnik leading. Just when everything was going good for me against Carlsen...Radjabov failed me with a good fight and a sure draw...only to blunder. What a chess nightmare! I will still wager my house on Anand. So many of Carlsen fans want this to happen: "but you better be careful of what you ask for."Tongue Out

  • vor 17 Monate

    Champeknight

    If Svidler observes that Ivanchuk is throwing away the game, i feel that the former may play for justice.

  • vor 17 Monate

    chessrook1234

    Carlsen will have it tough against the russis who wants to keep him out of championship,,, All are giing Svidler tips to win tomorrow..lol..Chucky will run into time trouble by 10th move tomorrow...btw what was gelfand doing for last few moves..avoiding a draw???

  • vor 17 Monate

    chessrook1234

    the short(er)chess game timings are helping certain players...like Carlsen. this should not have happened. Carlsen is unable to beat the 2800s Kramnik and Aronian, but beating up the poor 2700s (though the great worlds best Chucky tricked him)..I rate Carlsen performance mediocre for all the hype) and not deserving a crack at title.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Estragon

    It's been a fantastic, hard-fought tournament!  Although Radjabov's lack of practice over the last 18-24 months is showing, and Chucky's performance is erratic (nothing new there, he is often either the most brilliant player on earth or a complete mess), even the others in the middle of the pack like Svidler and Gelfand have shown they are not there as filler material.

     

    The conspiracy nuts are, well, nuts.  The idea that a Ukrainian like Ivanchuk or an Armenian like Aronian would throw games to help a Russian (Kramnik) is just laughable.  No self-respecting Ukrainian or Armenian would so much as urinate on a Russian if he were on fire.

     

    That it comes down to the final day is fitting.  Here's to great chess tomorrow!

    Cool

  • vor 17 Monate

    Lateriflora

    It's good to see the young man looking more together.  However, the oddity of this tournament is that Magnus is the one with "boring" wins where he grinds someone down in a technical endgame.  Kramnik has had a few games where the combinations, played and unplayed, were quite beautiful and very complex.  I'd like to see Magnus win round 14 with a middlegame tactical shot.  To the notion of Kramnik as "boring" I cannot ascribe.  He was boring against Kasparov because that's the way to beat that particular guy.

  • vor 17 Monate

    IndianHarry

    I don't know what Radjabov and Ivanchuk doing in this tournament not playing to there mark. More than this unnecessarily Chucky win a game against Carlsen and given a way to Kramnik. Now Carlsen need to win a game against Svidler(if he needs to be safe) to challenge Anand. Unexpectedly Kramnik strikes form which makes more complication to Carlsen to win this tourney. Now everything depends on tomorrow match results.

    This is nice treat for us to see a chess tournament like this. 

  • vor 17 Monate

    Khaos90

    Carlsen did manage to outplay radjabov in the final stage of the game and i won't call it lucky simple because time is essential in all chess games and that is something we just have to deal with it, whether we like it or not. It's admirable that he kept pushing even when the position was locked and everyone was yelling for a draw, that just shows why we need Carlsen to face Anand in the World Championship and not Kramnik.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Champeknight

    That's because at least 80% of chess playing spectators like new, exciting Carlsen over old style Kramnik.

  • vor 17 Monate

    puppylover107

    woah amazing endgame ... Anyone referring it as tricks doesn't understand endgame at all

  • vor 17 Monate

    bagpiper123456

    Why do people root for Carlsen because "he has the best chance"?

    Why don't we just like players for their style and who they are? And how come when Kramnik lead yesterday everybody was unhappy while today, now that Carlsen tied him, everything is ok?

  • vor 17 Monate

    Pohjanpoika

    The most recent game I found in chessgames.com where  Kramnik wins against Ivanchuk playing black was in 2001. So a draw or win by Ivanchuk should be the most likley result. Sadly it dosn't feel so.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Mercurial1

    Great chess by Gelfand! 

  • vor 17 Monate

    az09

    I admire Carlsen, he is undoubtfully one of the greatest chess players ever, but I think he doesn't deserve to be World Champion yet, just because others deserve it more.

    If he becomes champion now what will he do for the next 15 years of his career? No one will be able to challenge him until then. Anand is a great player and he should be able to hold his own against Carlsen on the slow time control games, yet, even if he does, he will be obliterated in the tie-breaks. Therefore he will have to play for a win in slow time control, which might actually put enough pressure on him to make him lose anyway. Unfair for someone who has been playing chess for all his life.

  • vor 17 Monate

    ildolphino

    @TheMagicianPaul

    you are absolutely right! I think the arbiters should overrule the result of the game and still declare it as a draw. People shouldn't be allowed to exhaust their opponents anymore Undecided

  • vor 17 Monate

    Steve212000

    Go Chucky Go!

  • vor 17 Monate

    andrew1023

    I think what is terrible is the amazing chess will eventually be decided on whether or not Ivanchuk can tell time! 

    Who ever wins, wins and that is fine! but to think that one may play for the world championship based on someone else's inability to tell time is really anticlimatix and disappointing! 

  • vor 17 Monate

    Vladan88

    @TheMagicianPaul 

    Ridiculous statement. Isn't that how all chess games are won and lost? People fail to correctly respond. 

     

     

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