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Candidates Tournament Round 10

  • SonofPearl
  • on 27.03.13 12:15.

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The race for the finish line is underway at the London Candidates Tournament!  In round 10, Vladimir Kramnik scored his second win of the tournament by beating his compatriot Alexander Grischuk with the black pieces in a Berlin endgame. Kramnik popularised the Berlin when he used it successfully against Kasparov in their 2000 world championship match, and he used it to good effect again today.  Grischuk is known for his ability to play good moves quickly in time-trouble, but even he can make mistakes and 30.Bxd4 was a miscalculation which cost the game.

Vladimir Kramnik won his second game of the tournament to stay in contention

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Lev Aronian faced Vassily Ivanchuk and today's random opening from Chucky was the Budapest Gambit. "I just wanted to play it, so I played it" he answered, less than helpfully to an enquiry in the press conference after the game.

It wasn't the unusual choice of opening that did for Ivanchuk though, it was his familiar foe: the clock. Yet again, he ran very short of time and blundered in an otherwise reasonable position.  A shocking tournament for the Ukrainian, and Aronian was the latest beneficiary of his largesse.

Lev Aronian ponders his next move while Magnus Carlsen looks on

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Aronian's win put him temporarily back at the top of the standings, but meanwhile Magnus Carlsen was nursing a long-term advantage against Boris Gelfand deep into a tricky endgame.  Eventually, Carlsen established connected passed pawns that Gelfand was unable to stop, and it was another vital win for the Norwegian, keeping him in the tournament lead.

Magnus Carlsen kept ahead of the pack with another win

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The other game of the day was a short draw between Teimour Radjabov and Peter Svidler.  After a disastrous few rounds Radjabov was clearly content to settle for damage limitation, his only ambition being to stop the rot.

Teimour Radjabov has had a disappointing tournament

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The standings after 10 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872 7
Levon Aronian ARM 2809
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 6
Peter Svidler RUS 2747
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand 1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

18637 Aufrufe 129 Kommentare
10 Stimmen

Kommentare


  • vor 17 Monate

    fershenko7

    I think only Carlsen or Aronian can beat Anand...if it happens anyone else win this tournament, it would be very dissapionting...

  • vor 17 Monate

    nebunulpecal

    Regarding fixing, this tournament format seems to favor Carlsen, not the "Russians". The "genius" Carlsen could only beat the outsiders, but got nothing with white against Aronian and Kramnik and suffered with black against Kramnik, so in a match with either of them I'm not sure if he would be as successful as in an indirect race like this.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Adrian_Kinnersley

    How about making 'the candidates' an elimination tournament among the top four players by rating, excepting the current world champion?

    Round 1: Players ranked #1 and #4 play a best of 8 match, with rapid tiebreaks if needed. Players ranked #2 and #3 do likewise.

    Round 2: The two winners from round 1 play each other best of 10.

    Final round: The winner of round 2 plays the current world champion.

    There can be a month or two between each round, giving players some time to rest and prepare.

    If anyone has a problem with the use of ELO ratings to determine the top 4, it should be possible to do an aggregation of scores from established 'super-tournaments' such as Tata, Biel, Bilbao, London, Nanjing, etc. But using ELO probably causes the fewest complications.

    Any thoughts?

  • vor 17 Monate

    wik8

    suggestions that this tournament is fixed are absolutely ludicrous... all of these men are incredibly strong grandmasters with good integrity.  it isn't the cold war anymore and the ghost of reshevsky has long since passed on.  internet patzers would like to feel relevant in this super-tournament, and the only way that they can do so is to spread unfounded gossip and innuendo...

  • vor 17 Monate

    Paulzzz

    There are four rounds left in the Candidates 2013, and our genius has not yet secured for himself the victory. it seems that 0.5 points ahead of the second rival is too little in order to justify the use of the word "genius".

  • vor 17 Monate

    philipalivar

    I support magnus carlsen and levon aronian. . . . you two are the best!

  • vor 17 Monate

    aravot

    Life is good!

     

  • vor 17 Monate

    Ecurbetneilav628

    Magnus is a very brilliant young guy..it happens Lev is my favourite, but whoever win the tournament, he deserves to challenge the chess WC...

  • vor 17 Monate

    aravot

    My favorite player is Aronian and I would like to see him on the top of the tournament. I think Levon has all the qualities to be the next World Chess Champion.  

  • vor 17 Monate

    Champeknight

    Grischuk losing today is suspicious. As analyzed by gms, it should have been a draw until he blundered in the final seconds.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Pohjanpoika

    Everything else than a win by Carlsen would be really dissipointing and the next world championship match will be just as irrelevent as the last one. 

    It feels like chance plays too big role in this way of choosing a challenger when there is no doubt who it should be. And I have no understanding for the tiebreak rule. Couldent the shared winners atleast play for such an important win!? 

  • vor 17 Monate

    Ecurbetneilav628

    I was happy because Lev is still on top next to Magnus..anyway still four more rounds to go, hope Lev will win again in round eleven againts Svidler...

  • vor 17 Monate

    Ecurbetneilav628

    I think we have to stop this.. It's nonsense!..Who can prove there's a game fixing happened?..because Kramnik won over fellow russian Grischuk..Aronian won over Ivanchuk?..Well, I think the Chess organizers have to create an investigation panel to prove it right..we could not just blame those Rusky guys who participated on this tournament because of their poor showing during the match..Those Ruskies have the right to participate because they are qualified for this tounament....

  • vor 17 Monate

    Dev5

    carlsen has this obvoiusly! :D

  • vor 17 Monate

    FancyKnight

    Budapest!

  • vor 17 Monate

    Champeknight

    True, Chucky's flagging and time woes are shameful at this elite level. Aronian enjoyed two wins out of this.

  • vor 17 Monate

    dzindzifan

    Chucky is NUTS and he is a disgrace to Super GM's and to this tournament.  He is not going to steal the limelight with his ridiculous and disgraceful performance.  As a kid growing up and someday hoping to be in one of the greatest tournaments of all time-- is this what you envision your performance to be?  4 Losses on time and two time-losses in a row!  This guy is a bum. 

  • vor 17 Monate

    rana2000

    vaiuuii I agree with you. well said. I still think carlsen is the best mentally and he will win.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Paulzzz

    It is indeed strange that Chucky lost to Aronian both games. But is not it also strange that the main contenders, Carlsen and Aronian, also made draws in the rounds 1 and 8 without much struggle. Obviously, Carlsen did not wish to take serious risks in those games, but he lost good chances to prove his superior strength. Now his task appears to be more difficult. In order to win the tournament of such level it cannot be enough for Magnus to show his bravery with the outsiders. Maybe, this is his usual strategy, as some witnesses often say, but not the style of a genius.

  • vor 17 Monate

    Vladan88

    Carlsen is still going to win the event, regardless of whether match-fixing is taking place or not. It would be natural to see match-fixing in this type of tournament where 7 players were born in USSR. If, for instance, Grischuk doesn't think he has chances for first place, why not help a fellow countryman Kramnik. It's an inherent problem with this format. I think the optimal format is matches, but not what we saw at 2011 Candidates tournament. If the games are tied at best out of 4, play another pair of games at regular time control to decide the outcome. I still shudder when I recall how the matches were decided by blunders in rapids. This should not happen.

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