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Candidates Tournament Round 10

  • SonofPearl
  • on 27.03.13 12:15.

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The race for the finish line is underway at the London Candidates Tournament!  In round 10, Vladimir Kramnik scored his second win of the tournament by beating his compatriot Alexander Grischuk with the black pieces in a Berlin endgame. Kramnik popularised the Berlin when he used it successfully against Kasparov in their 2000 world championship match, and he used it to good effect again today.  Grischuk is known for his ability to play good moves quickly in time-trouble, but even he can make mistakes and 30.Bxd4 was a miscalculation which cost the game.

Vladimir Kramnik won his second game of the tournament to stay in contention

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Lev Aronian faced Vassily Ivanchuk and today's random opening from Chucky was the Budapest Gambit. "I just wanted to play it, so I played it" he answered, less than helpfully to an enquiry in the press conference after the game.

It wasn't the unusual choice of opening that did for Ivanchuk though, it was his familiar foe: the clock. Yet again, he ran very short of time and blundered in an otherwise reasonable position.  A shocking tournament for the Ukrainian, and Aronian was the latest beneficiary of his largesse.

Lev Aronian ponders his next move while Magnus Carlsen looks on

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Aronian's win put him temporarily back at the top of the standings, but meanwhile Magnus Carlsen was nursing a long-term advantage against Boris Gelfand deep into a tricky endgame.  Eventually, Carlsen established connected passed pawns that Gelfand was unable to stop, and it was another vital win for the Norwegian, keeping him in the tournament lead.

Magnus Carlsen kept ahead of the pack with another win

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The other game of the day was a short draw between Teimour Radjabov and Peter Svidler.  After a disastrous few rounds Radjabov was clearly content to settle for damage limitation, his only ambition being to stop the rot.

Teimour Radjabov has had a disappointing tournament

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The standings after 10 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872 7
Levon Aronian ARM 2809
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 6
Peter Svidler RUS 2747
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand 1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

19014 Aufrufe 129 Kommentare
10 Stimmen

Kommentare


  • vor 18 Monate

    Lateriflora

    @zinsch:

    Obviously the competition is very, very far from "weak".  However, the only guy who came even close to the 6-0 (twice!) decimation of Fischer's opponents in the Candidates was Kasparov and he was a step DOWN!!  My point is simple:  Ratings are only a very rough guide.  Capa didn't lose for ten YEARS.  Everybody avoided Morphy.  Fischer won the Candidates 18.5 to 2.5.  Freaking 2.5!!  Kasparov is only a giant of that scale RELATIVE to his era but not in absolute terms.  Magnus' 2872 ratings has not been demonstrated by the total devastation of those greats I mention.

  • vor 18 Monate

    vegma

    Prior to his match with Spassky in 1972, Fischer played 19 games in a row without any losses or draws, and this was against people in the Interzonal, and Taimanov, Larsen and Petrosian. 

    19 wins in a row. Against very good players. 

    Has anyone beaten this? Can anyone beat this? 

  • vor 18 Monate

    Zinsch

    @Scutelleria: I am not cherrypicking. Kasparov played many times in Wijk aan Zee and had many chances to achieve 11/14, which is what you claimed, he can do.

    And you forget Carlsen's remaining pairings. He certainly is going to score well in the last four rounds, just wait.

    You also forget that Kasparov lost his title against Kramnik, because he was unable to break Kramnik's Berlin Defense. So no, even Kasparov wouldn't be able to easily defeat Kramnik (and probably Aronian).

    And it is not surprising that only 3 out of 8 players have a positve score, because it's a round-robin and if someone wins, another has to lose. That's just how it works. It's not prove that the competition is weak.

  • vor 18 Monate

    martonick

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • vor 18 Monate

    Lateriflora

    @zinsch

     

    Well, you are cherrypicking one result.  However, let's just stick to this tournament as an objection lesson about a LACK of overwhelming strength for anybody.  I truly believe that Kasparov would have at least one, probably two decisive results against Kramnik and/or Aronian.  Look at the points table.  Kramnik and Aronian are the only two players with a non-negative score aside from Carlsen.  Five players with minus scores.  I really can't imagine Kasparov advancing on the backs of the weaker 62% of the table SOLELY.

  • vor 18 Monate

    Zinsch

    @Scutellaria: It just so happens that Kasparov's best in Wijk aan Zee is 10/14, which Carlsen also did this year. And the competition in Wijk aan Zee is not as fierce as this Candidates Tournament.

  • vor 18 Monate

    Aguchi71

    I hope Anand eats the standing challenger.

  • vor 18 Monate

    chichito

    with 4 games remaining I doubt magnus finish with a 9.5, he sould be finishing with at least 10, 2 wins 2 draws, at least

  • vor 18 Monate

    Lateriflora

    Yes, the new ratings are getting more inflated with each passing minute.  Gary Kasparov would get 11 out of 14 in such a tournament just as he decimated people in his last Russian Championship.  Magnus will likely finish with 9.5 out of 14 and finish first by 0.5.  The world has STILL not seen the like of Fischer or Kasparov.  I don't care about 2870.  It's a number. We all know better.

  • vor 18 Monate

    ngaihboy

    @Marcokim    
     
     
    are you also  
    Ecurbetneilav628  by any chance ?  

  • vor 18 Monate

    forrie

    Magnus have easier games ahead while Aronion and Kramnik still have to face each other.

    Magnus fill face Anand.

  • vor 18 Monate

    chichito

    magnus has the sole lead and hes way above the rest of the remaining opponents, so no excuse he has his own destiny in his own hands, no one to blame but himself if he does not win it

  • vor 18 Monate

    sbooder

    "Now you are fair game and if the ex-Soviets can conspire to cheat a marginal number one"


    Why would say, two Russians  (Kramnik & Svidler) want to conspire to allow an Armenian (Aronian) to be No1?

  • vor 18 Monate

    Ecurbetneilav628

    @Marcokim...Very good comment!!

  • vor 18 Monate

    Marcokim

    Dear Magnus,

    You are world number 1.

    But you needed to beat Ivanchuk and Aronian at least once to prove that you are the best, and you didn't. Now you are fair game and if the ex-Soviets can conspire to cheat a marginal number one, so be it. You played solidly but lacked the pizazz against top opposition.

    I hope you win, but won't cry if you don't. You really need to win 3 out of the next 4 to have a solid chance.

    Good luck.

    Gary Kasparov.

  • vor 18 Monate

    Marcokim

    @Brazda said

    "...Radjabov...he is the only one to gain his place not with talent but with money"

    Talking out of your arse is free me fellow Yank... but isn't Radjabov number 4 in the world?? Maybe I am stupid...??

    As for fixing, I don't doubt that it can happen, but a true world champion should rack enough wins to cancel out that possibility. Meaning Carlsen really had to beat Kramnik and Aronian at least once, which he didn't. He is the strongest player in the world, but only marginally, and if the Russians can conspire to cheat a marginal number one, so be it. His only saving grace will be to win at least 3 of the remaining 4 games.

  • vor 18 Monate

    systemovich

    Gelfand probably lost because he lost many tempi having had to move his queen out of danger numerous times.

  • vor 18 Monate

    Zinsch

    The reason, why they changed the tournament format is Carlsen. He didn't play in the last candidates tournament, because he didn't like the match format. So FIDE changed it for him, so he would participate in the next one.

  • vor 18 Monate

    SubhankarD

    Kramnik try your best....but he is defeating his compatriots let him under suspicion....he must try to defeat others..but in that case he loses his fighting spirit and strives Draw!! He is the only player to comment "Chess is a Drawish Game!!" 

  • vor 18 Monate

    fershenko7

    I think only Carlsen or Aronian can beat Anand...if it happens anyone else win this tournament, it would be very dissapionting...

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