Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

2012 London Grand Prix Finale!

  • SonofPearl
  • on 03.10.12 10:37.

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix banner.jpg

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov held a half point lead going into the final round of the 2012 FIDE London Grand Prix at Simpson's-In-The-Strand. Playing with the white pieces in the final round the Azeri player took no risk against Peter Leko, aiming to claim the draw he needed to secure at least a share of first place.

That decision opened the door for his closest rivals to catch him if they could win their final round games.  Early tournament leader Boris Gelfand was equal to the challenge, sacrificing the exchange against Rustam Kasimdzhanov and eventually earning a victory.

Veselin Topalov had the black pieces against Anish Giri, and despite early simplifcation to an endgame he posed problems that his young opponent failed to solve and won the game.

Alexander Grischuk needed a victory against Hikaru Nakamura to join the winners, but Nakamura fought fire with fire by playing the Sicilian Dragon!  Their hard-fought game ended in a draw.

The winner's prize-money is shared between Mamedyarov, Gelfand and Topalov with each receiving €22,500. Grand Prix points will also be shared. If the tournament had used the common Sonnenborn-Berger tie-break method, then Topalov would have been first, Gelfand second, and Mamedyarov third.

The winners (l to r): Boris Gelfand, Veselin Topalov and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Mamedyarov, Gelfand, Topalov.jpg

The final standings of the 2012 FIDE London Grand Prix

# Name Fed Elo Pts GP Pts
1 Topalov Veselin BUL 2752 7 140
2 Gelfand Boris ISR 2738 7 140
3 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar AZE 2729 7 140
4 Grischuk Alexander RUS 2754 90
5 Leko Peter HUN 2737 6 80
6 Wang Hao CHN 2742 70
7 Adams Michael ENG 2722 5 55
8 Ivanchuk Vassily UKR 2769 5 55
9 Kasimdzhanov Rustam UZB 2684 35
10 Dominguez Perez Leinier CUB 2725 35
11 Giri Anish NED 2730 4 15
12 Nakamura Hikaru USA 2783 4 15

.

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (left) drew his game with Peter Leko to secure a share of first place

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov Peter Leko.jpg

.

.
Boris Gelfand (left) claimed a share of first place with a win against Rustam Kasimdzhanov

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Boris Gelfand Rustam Kasimdzhanov.jpg

.

.
Veselin Topalov (right) made it three at the top by beating Anish Giri

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Anish Giri Veselin Topalov.jpg

.

.
Alexander Grischuk (left) could only draw with Hikaru Nakamura and finished fourth

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Alexander Grischuk Hikaru Nakamura.jpg

.

.
Michael Adams (left) finished 7th as a last-minute replacement for Peter Svidler

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Michael Adams Leinier Dominguez Perez.jpg

.

.

Vassily Ivanchuk (left) finished 8th, with Wang Hao 6th.

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 11 Vassily Ivanchuk Wang Hao.jpg

.

.

The London Grand Prix was the first tournament of the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix series. The next Grand Prix event will be in Tashkent, Uzbekistan from 21 November - 5 December.  The other venues will be Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin and Paris.  Details of dates and participants are here.

Each tournament is a single round-robin featuring 12 out of the 18 players in the Grand Prix, and each player competes in four of the six events. The overall winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix qualify for the March 2014 Candidates Tournament.

The official regulations for the 2012 FIDE Grand Prix can be found here.

The official website of the 2012 London Grand Prix is here. Games sourced via TWIC. The excellent photos are by Ray Morris-Hill.

6780 Aufrufe 31 Kommentare
6 Stimmen

Kommentare


  • vor 2 Jahre

    _valentin_

    TheYear9876:  Black cannot avoid the perpetual check by the white queen (on g5, e7, d8), and white cannot avoid to play on, since they have no winning attack but are a piece down in material.  So it's a draw by repetition.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    TheYear9876

    at the risk of appearing stupid can someone explain the final postion in t he ivanchuk game?  why was that a draw?

  • vor 2 Jahre

    WalangAlam

    Congratulations to all 3 winners! Great games! Nice to see Topalov in form again!

  • vor 2 Jahre

    Summum_Malum

    Watch out, I think deepak64 is a troll! .. 

  • vor 2 Jahre

    InexperiencedExpert

    Gelfand's game is just superb.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    deepak64

    Very nice games. But do avoid draw for better games.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    Summum_Malum

    Nice to see Topalov back! Now I just want to see him play the Benoni.. 

  • vor 2 Jahre

    nyLsel

    congratulations!

  • vor 2 Jahre

    _valentin_

    Congratulations to all three joint winners!  

    Interestingly, despite their high rankings in the ELO table, none of them have enjoyed a major tournament victory for a fairly long time now (if we don't count knock-out events such as the Candidates 2011), so they must be happy to get high on the stage now!  Great, well-deserved work; happy for all three of them!

  • vor 2 Jahre

    Boka7

    gelfand is the best in this tournament.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    AKirilov

    Браво на Веселин!!! Много силно се надявах той да вземе първото място, както всъщност се и случи.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    ferdinandplebie

    you know nakamura you are a very talented player like tal and kasparov combined but you have to be humble.so that you will draw fans into you side, in that your playing strength will be lift up

  • vor 2 Jahre

    P_G_M

    @KingsEye

    It will be great if Nakamura will contend for the WCC but first he needs to learn to be a gentleman and humble human being.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    APawnCanDream

    @Wicked_Soul

    Keep in mind that Nakamura didn't even break into the 2700 club until four years ago, and has just begun to play against top caliber players reguarly about three years ago or so. He's still quite young too, 24, and has a good 10+ years ahead of him easily. He could likely make it into the top three in the future, and possibly contend for the world championship. We'll see!

  • vor 2 Jahre

    P_G_M

    @yakushi12345

    The first time I posted my comment chess.com removed it. But I saved the comment as a word document, so I posted it again but the copy and past procedure made the letter font size huge hahahaha 

    I just edited the letter font size Wink

  • vor 2 Jahre

    Wicked_Soul

    Clearly, Nakamura will never be the in the top 3 or he would be there already. Just another arrogant wannabe...

  • vor 2 Jahre

    APawnCanDream

    Everyone can have an off tournament. Nakamura still has three more in the Grand Prix series, he isn't out of the running from one poor performance. I'm more upset that Gata Kamsky didn't make it into the cycle this time, he's one of my two favorite players and seems to do quite well in these high pressure events (maybe due to experience?).

    I'm glad Gelfand and Topalov did well.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    yakushi12345

    I ALSO ENJOY CAPS LOCK

  • vor 2 Jahre

    P_G_M

    Extremely poor performance by Nakamura at top level competition, in his last 12 games he had 6 loses, 4 draws and only two wins for a total of 4 points out of 12 points (33%).

    And his only two wins were against a 2684 Kazimdzhanov (who ended sharing 8th with Ivanchuck and Adams one full point ahead of Nakamura) and against the young and still sometimes naive Giri who yesterday lost against Nakamura was due to a huge positional blunder on move 46...,Be5???, and Nakamura being a more experienced player he simply and immediately took advantage of Giri's positional blunder.

    Nakamura needs to stop Tweeting and start preparing better for these top level tournaments if he ever intends to play a WCC candidates tournament.

  • vor 2 Jahre

    Big_T_Maya

    Boris's game was brilliant!

Nach oben

Antwort senden: